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Yohji Yamamoto | Like finding a lost wedding ring | Yohji Yamamoto in conversation with Ligaya Salazar

collectingknowledge:

LS: Your menswear always feels a little bit tongue in cheek, there’s always a wink. Is that intentional?

YY: Yes. In the world, in life, 90 per cent of people are spending a so - called ordinary life. Have a family, have a child, and get educated: ordinary. Grow up: ordinary, and get married: ordinary. And getting a job: ordinary and getting old: ordinary, and getting sick: ordinary, and going to the grave: ordinary. More than 90 per cent. This is not my customer.
          The people who choose freedom, these are special people, or these are the sad people, you can say. Freedom carries a strong responsibility. If you deny the way of ordinary families, you have to find how you make people sad, how you are hurting people. What you are creating or what you are saying is not understood, so you will always feel isolation. It’s always walking on the edge of life, every day. I call this ‘outsider of life’. So let’s say my men’s line is ‘outsider’ look, ‘outsider’ fashion.

8 notes

Akiko Yano - “It’s for You” (Welcome Back, 1989 / Yohji Yamamoto - The Show Vol 3, 1995), played during the finale of Yohji Yamamoto Fw94. Beautiful piece to go with an indescribable collection.

Filed under Akiko Yano Yohji Yamamoto Sublime

468 notes

dantebykiko:

RARE.
Yohji Yamamoto team 1995:
Tadashi Kubo - Yohji Yamamoto Pour Homme
Yukio Sato - Y’s for men
Yohji Yamamoto - Genius 
Koji Nagano - Y’s
Ichiro Seta - Yohji Yamamoto Femme
Takayuki Kurihara - Production
Yoshifumi Motai - Yohji Yamamoto + Noir

dantebykiko:

RARE.

Yohji Yamamoto team 1995:

Tadashi Kubo - Yohji Yamamoto Pour Homme

Yukio Sato - Y’s for men

Yohji Yamamoto - Genius 

Koji Nagano - Y’s

Ichiro Seta - Yohji Yamamoto Femme

Takayuki Kurihara - Production

Yoshifumi Motai - Yohji Yamamoto + Noir

16 notes


Also, Issey Miyake, who presaged Kawakubo and Yamamoto in the west, was designing in the early 1980s with a sensibility that illustrated a dhared vision (although, by the end of the decade, Miyake’s work was clearly different from theirs). On some occasions, their aesthetics were so new that each designer’s work was hardly distinguishable from the others’, as seen in a pair of editorial spreads that appeared in American Vogue in April and July of 1983. In the April publication, work by these three designers appeared separately in photographs by Irving Penn, but the clothes, in a predominantly dark palette with loose, unconstructed silhouettes, were somewhat indistinguishable. That July, the portrayal of the Japanese triumvirate was even more daring and evocative than in the previous editorial spread. In contrast to those taken in Penn’s sterile studio, the photographs by Hans Feurer were taken outdoors and featured models, solo and in groups, as well as details of the clothing. The models’ odd eye makeup (ombré’d masks made from a gradation of blue shadow, or a solid horizontal line across closed eyes and continuing across the face) and their wind-blown, swirling manes evoked a sense of boundless freedom as they moved briskly past the camera.
-Japan Fashion Now - Formalism and Revolution : Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto - In praise of Shadows : Convergence and Divergence by Patricia Mears

It’s very refreshing to finally know the context of photos you’ve seen reblogged a hundred times.

Also, Issey Miyake, who presaged Kawakubo and Yamamoto in the west, was designing in the early 1980s with a sensibility that illustrated a dhared vision (although, by the end of the decade, Miyake’s work was clearly different from theirs). On some occasions, their aesthetics were so new that each designer’s work was hardly distinguishable from the others’, as seen in a pair of editorial spreads that appeared in American Vogue in April and July of 1983. In the April publication, work by these three designers appeared separately in photographs by Irving Penn, but the clothes, in a predominantly dark palette with loose, unconstructed silhouettes, were somewhat indistinguishable. That July, the portrayal of the Japanese triumvirate was even more daring and evocative than in the previous editorial spread. In contrast to those taken in Penn’s sterile studio, the photographs by Hans Feurer were taken outdoors and featured models, solo and in groups, as well as details of the clothing. The models’ odd eye makeup (ombré’d masks made from a gradation of blue shadow, or a solid horizontal line across closed eyes and continuing across the face) and their wind-blown, swirling manes evoked a sense of boundless freedom as they moved briskly past the camera.

-Japan Fashion Now - Formalism and Revolution : Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto - In praise of Shadows : Convergence and Divergence by Patricia Mears

It’s very refreshing to finally know the context of photos you’ve seen reblogged a hundred times.

Filed under Issey Miyake Yohji Yamamoto Rei Kawakubo Japanese Fashion Vogue 1983

28 notes


If the Japanese succeeded so magnificently in disfiguring and refiguring the fashion system, it is because they looked on Western fashion from a different perspective. The designers from Tokyo were able to draw on a wealth of alternative sartorial encodings of the relationship between the sexes, as well as on a fundamentally different play between body and fabric. For example, while the décolleté was the classical female erotic zone in Europe until the nineteenth century, in Japan it was the back of the neck. Yamamoto’s white felt dress of the Autumn/Winter 1996-97 collection exposes the neck as the erotic zone par excellence.
-Future Beauty : 30 Years of Japanese Fashion - The Empire Designs Back by Barbara Vinken

I finally managed to work out my passport problems (Although it cost me $210) so I can visit the Seattle Art Museum to see the Future Beauty : 30 Years of Japanese Fashion exhibition. Can’t believe I’ll see this dress in person very soon.

If the Japanese succeeded so magnificently in disfiguring and refiguring the fashion system, it is because they looked on Western fashion from a different perspective. The designers from Tokyo were able to draw on a wealth of alternative sartorial encodings of the relationship between the sexes, as well as on a fundamentally different play between body and fabric. For example, while the décolleté was the classical female erotic zone in Europe until the nineteenth century, in Japan it was the back of the neck. Yamamoto’s white felt dress of the Autumn/Winter 1996-97 collection exposes the neck as the erotic zone par excellence.

-Future Beauty : 30 Years of Japanese Fashion - The Empire Designs Back by Barbara Vinken

I finally managed to work out my passport problems (Although it cost me $210) so I can visit the Seattle Art Museum to see the Future Beauty : 30 Years of Japanese Fashion exhibition. Can’t believe I’ll see this dress in person very soon.

Filed under Future Beauty Japanese Fashion Yohji Yamamoto FW96 Seattle Art Museum

8 notes

shedding by Nagano Toyokazu on Flickr.
Children exude such unintentional beauty. For me, this beauty is heightened in the Japanese and their ideology of wabi - sabi, or the appreciation / acceptance of the ephemeral and the imperfect. This way of thought offers one inner peace as opposed to the desire and pursuit of a suffocating, narrow standard of beauty seen in my native culture.

shedding by Nagano Toyokazu on Flickr.

Children exude such unintentional beauty. For me, this beauty is heightened in the Japanese and their ideology of wabi - sabi, or the appreciation / acceptance of the ephemeral and the imperfect. This way of thought offers one inner peace as opposed to the desire and pursuit of a suffocating, narrow standard of beauty seen in my native culture.

Filed under Nagano Toyokazu Transience